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What is the most important information I should know about ceftriaxone?

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to ceftriaxone or to similar antibiotics, such as Ceftin, Cefzil, Keflex, Omnicef, and others. Tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, especially penicillins or other antibiotics. Do not use ceftriaxone in a child without a doctor’s advice. Ceftriaxone should never be used in a premature baby, or in any newborn baby who has jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

How should I use ceftriaxone?

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not use this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Ceftriaxone is injected into a muscle, or into a vein through an IV. You may be shown how to use an IV at home. Do not give yourself this medicine if you do not understand how to use the injection and properly dispose of needles, IV tubing, and other items used. You may need to mix ceftriaxone with a liquid (diluent) before using it. If you are using the injections at home, be sure you understand how to properly mix and store the medication. Use only the diluent your doctor has recommended. Do not mix ceftriaxone in the same injection with other antibiotics, or with any diluent that contains calcium, including a TPN (total parenteral nutrition) solution. After mixing your medicine, you will need to use it within a certain number of hours or days. This will depend on the diluent and how you store the mixture (at room temperature, in a refrigerator, or frozen). Carefully follow the mixing and storage instructions provided with your medicine. Ask your pharmacist if you have questions. If you use other injectable medications, be sure to flush your intravenous catheter between injections of each medication.

Use this medicine for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics. Ceftriaxone will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu. Ceftriaxone can cause unusual results with certain lab tests for glucose (sugar) in the urine. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using this medicine. Store unmixed ceftriaxone powder at room temperature, away from moisture, heat, and light.

If your medicine was provided in a frozen form or was frozen after mixing, thaw it in a refrigerator or at room temperature. Do not warm in a microwave or boiling water. Use the medicine as soon as possible after thawing it. Do not refreeze. Use a disposable needle and syringe only once. Follow any state or local laws about throwing away used needles and syringes. Use a puncture-proof “sharps” disposal container (ask your pharmacist where to get one and how to throw it away). Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while using ceftriaxone?

Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or has blood in it, call your doctor. Do not use any medicine to stop the diarrhea unless your doctor has told you to.

Expert advice

  • It is given as a drip (intravenous infusion) or as an injection directly into a vein or into a muscle. It is made up by the doctor, or nurse using water for injections or a suitable infusion fluid.
  • Do not drive because you may feel sleepy or dizzy while being treated with ceftriaxone.
  • Tell your doctor if you are taking, have recently taken or might take any other medicines. This includes medicines you can obtain without a prescription.
  • Do not start or continue the ceftriaxone and consult your doctor if you have a liver or   kidney disease.
  • Do not take this drug and consult your doctor  if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or breastfeeding.

Frequently asked questions

Ceftriaxone

Q. Is ceftriaxone a form of penicillin drug? Is it bactericidal or bacteristatic?
No, ceftriaxone is not a penicillin drug. It is a cephalosporin antibiotic. It is bactericidal drug.
Q. Is ceftriaxone safe in liver disease?
Yes, ceftriaxone is safe in liver disease. Please consult your doctor for your medical condition before taking the drug.
Q. Is ceftriaxone compatible with potassium or potassium chloride?
Yes, ceftriaxone is compatible with potassium or potassium chloride when taken together.
Q.Is ceftriaxone the same as cephalexin, Monocef-o, Monocef 200, Monocef tablet, Cefakind, or Cefakind 250?
No, all are different cephalosporin antibiotics. Monocef-o, Monocef 200, or Monocef tablet contain cefpodoxmine, and Cefakind, or Cefakind 250 contain cefuroxime.
Q. What organisms does ceftriaxone cover?
Ceftriaxone is active against pseudomonas, staphylococcus, and klebsiella bacteria. It has no activity against chlamydia, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (mrsa), and mycoplasma.
Q. Is ceftriaxone, or Monocef safe during pregnancy or breastfeeding?
Ceftriaxone, or Monocef should only be given during pregnancy or breastfeeding when need has been clearly established. Please consult your doctor before taking the drug.
Manufacturer Aristo Pharma, India
Equivalent Brands Rocephin
Composition Ceftriaxone Sod
Discontinue Url No
pack

1, 2, 3

3 reviews for Monocef (Ceftriaxone)

  1. admin

    Timely delivery (less than 4 weeks).excellent customer support

  2. admin

    Easy and very quick delivery! Will use again in the future!

  3. admin

    Great service
    Great product and choice.
    Recommand this website

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